Saturday, September 19, 2015

Othello Act II S/R

Othello Act II Summary Response
Summary:
  • William Shakespeare’s Othello demonstrates the power of nature in a story and how strong it can be.
  • In act II, a storm wrecks the Turkish fleet that was heading to attack Cyprus. With Othello still at sea, many characters become worried about his safety. Upon his safe return, his friends rejoice, but trouble later ensues.
  • This unexpected storm results the character’s learning of how strong nature can be.
Response:
  • Topic sentence: William Shakespeare’s Othello accurately illustrates that the events of nature are reflections of the external storm between the characters, foreshadowing the tempest that will occur later in the act.
  • Claim 1: In Othello, Shakespeare conjures a storm when conflict occurs between the characters.
  • Set-up: While Othello fights a storm at sea, Iago starts a storm among the characters.
    • Evidence: Lead-in While waiting for news on Othello’s condition, Iago fuels the tension between the characters by giving Desdemona the backhanded compliment, “If she be black, and thereto have a wit, She’ll find a white that shall her blackness fit” (Shakespeare 2.1 134 ).
    • Iago makes a pun using “white” and “wit.” Black and white can mean brunettes and blondes, respectively. He uses “brunette” to mean ugly, and “blonde” to mean beautiful.  He says that even ugly women can attract men, as long as they are smart. In this, he is giving Desdemona a backhanded compliment. He uses small insults to stir up malcontentedness among the characters. Therefore, Othello’s storm at sea is matched by Iago’s storm among people.
  • Counterclaim 1: However,
    • In William Shakespeare's Othello, there seems to be a reflection between the plot and nature; however, there are several parts of the story that are not affected by or congruent with the course of nature.
    • Evidence: While Montano was speaking with a gentleman, another gentleman comes to tell them the great news, “News lads! our wars are done. The desperate tempest that so bang’d the Turks.” (Shakespeare 2.1 20-21)
    • The storm brings good mood to the characters at this point. Had Shakespeare truly wanted to reflect the lives of his characters in nature, he would have made his characters feel indignant for the entire duration of the whole storm.
    • The natural disasters that could be seen as the foreshadowing of fallouts between the characters in the future cannot be related to all of the major events in the Othello. Hence, there is no way to establish an accurate relationship between the natural world and the actions taken by characters’ in Shakespeare’s Othello.


Rebuttal:
  • William Shakespeare’s Othello demonstrates how the natural world plays a strong role in the outcome of people's lives.  
  • While there is a war in progress throughout the course of the story, the effect of nature is directly related to the domestic and personal drama between Othello, Iago, and their supporting characters. While the Turkish fleet is destroyed because of a storm at sea, there is turmoil at home. The disaster at sea is congruent with the storm of drama that Iago is creating to get revenge on Othello. At first glance it seems as though it is not plausible for the natural world to affect the personal lives of only a few people, however it is proven throughout Act II that it is entirely conceivable. This position seems reasonable because something that happens thousands of miles away should not be consistent with the actions and outcomes of random people. Upon further analysis, the natural world does have a major effect on the lives of Shakespeare’s characters because without the storm, Iago would have not have had the opportunity to destroy both Cassio’s and Othello’s happiness at the same time.



Thursday, September 10, 2015

Othello Act I S/R Porter, Kolpak

Othello Summary Response Outline


Summary:
  • Topic sentence: Act I of William Shakespeare’s Othello shows how women were treated like weak, innocent creatures that were, in a way, the property of men.
  • Brabantio, a senator of Venice and Desdemona’s father, is enraged when Othello, a black war leader, marries his daughter. He sees this as “stealing” her, and tracks down Othello. They go to trial much like one would about stolen property. The ownership of women is transferred from father to husband upon marriage, and it’s perceived that their worth is entirely dependent on their ability to marry well and reproduce.
  • Women are seen as property in the ways that they can be bought, stolen, or won.   


Response:
  • Topic sentence: Act I of William Shakespeare’s Othello accurately portrays how women were treated as property in a male-dominated world because they were seen as too weak to function on their own.
  • Claim 1:
    • Women were considered by many characters to be weak and unassuming. They were thought to have no strength of their own, and had to be taken care of by men. Women were treated as the property of men. They were also seen as innocent creatures, who were unable to make rational decisions by themselves concerning their own life or the life of others.
    • Evidence: When Iago comes to tell Brabantio that Desdemona had eloped with Othello, he states, “Look to your house, your daughter, and your bags!” (Shakespeare  1.1 86).
    • Iago considers women to be property, and groups her with other household items that can be stolen.
    • Women were treated as property and considered by most men to be weak and incapable.
  • Counterclaim 1: However, ....
    • Although women are seen as property throughout the play, Othello may be ahead of his time in terms of his view of women.
    • Evidence: Othello states, “I love the gentle Desdemona” (Shakespeare 1.1 25).
    • While others think women to have no function other than marriage and childbearing, Othello sees the positive actions she performs for herself and others, calling her gentle. He uses an adjective that could only be used to describe a person, not an inanimate object. Although Othello sees Desdemona as a person, her worth is meaningless to the rest of the community.
    • Othello was able to fall in love with Desdemona, not just because she was a woman, but because of her personality. Showing that Othello had a modern view regarding women, seeing them as people not property.   


Rebuttal:
A common view is that Othello sees Desdemona as a human being, instead of property, as he calls her “gentle.” This seems like a compliment to her loving nature.
Upon further analysis of how Othello treats Desdemona, he may be no different than the men who view women as weak. In describing her as “gentle,” he portrays Desdemona as weak. Othello may acknowledge that Desdemona is a person, but he would have used a different adjective to describe her if he felt that she was a strong, competent woman, capable of making decisions for herself.  


Bully S/R (redo2) Porter, Kolpak

Lee Hirsch’s Bully Summary Response

Summary:
  • Topic sentence:The documentary Bully, directed by Lee Hirsch, confronts the bullying some American students face at school.
  • Hirsch shows that all over the United States, children are terrified to come to school because they fear for their safety. This documentary brings to light how children are being bullied by their peers and the adults, who are supposed to protect them, just stand by and watch it happen. Bullying causes mental injury, physical injury, and death.
  • Concluding sentence: In conclusion, Hirsch shows how bullying is a nationwide epidemic and children have died due to schools’ ignorance.

Response:
  • Topic sentence: The documentary Bully, directed by Lee Hirsch correctly illustrates the immense problems that arise when schools and officials refuse to admit that their systems are faulty and change their bullying policies, because this ignorance is costing children their lives and spirits.
  • Claim 1:
    • Set-up: Many school systems are set up in such a way that bullying is not something that is monitored and instead it is the victim’s responsibility to talk to the officials, who often do not do anything. This shames victims in to vulnerable states into believing it’s their fault they are being hurt.
    • Lead in: Alex Libby, a twelve-year-old boy who being bullied, feels that it was his fault the bullying continued because he didn’t alert adults. He recalls,
    • Quote:  “I didn’t tell them what was going on, which was my mistake” (Hirsch).
    • Explanation: Children are very impressionable, and making it their responsibility to set aside their learning to talk to an official who may or may not believe them when they are in their worst states is just setting kids up for failure. Many kids have disabilities that make it near impossible for them to stand up for themselves or talk to faculty.
    • Conclusion: While it’s important that kids learn to be a self-advocate, the stakes should never be set as high as mental/physical injury, or even death.
  • Counterclaim 1: However, ....
    • Set Up: However, while most of the blame for bullying falls on the school system, there is only so much that the teachers can do to protect their students. Students and parents are always very fast to place blame on the school system, when in fact, there is a limit to what the teachers can prevent. Ultimately, kids will be mean, and they will say and do hurtful things.
    • Lead In: An assistant principal in the Murray County School District discussed the practicality of assigning responsibility for the kids onto the schools. She stated,
    • Quote: “We can’t stop kids from saying bad things and we can’t watch what kids do every minute”  (Hirsch).
    • Explanation: The school system cannot be blamed for all bullying because, even though parents hope that teachers know what their child is doing while they are at school, there is no possible way for the teachers to monitor every child, every second of the day.
Rebuttal:
  • At first glance, it seems as though the teachers may not be responsible for everything that happens while children are at school, but upon further analysis of of each situation, the ultimate responsibility falls on the teachers.  
  • It cannot be denied that schools can not keep tabs on everything every student says every second of the day.
  • While this view seems reasonable at first glance, a closer look at the responsibilities of schools must be taken. It is the law to go to school. When a parent sends a child to school, they are entrusting the teachers and officials with the safety and well-being of their child. It is unacceptable for these places that shape the rest of a child’s life to knowingly foster hateful speech and painful actions. When a child is beaten up at school or commits suicide because of bullying, the school has broken the trust of the parents and has failed the child.
  • Bullying is a serious fault, and cannot be treated with ignorance any longer, as this fault is killing children.

Concluding Sentence:
  • In conclusion, there is no logical way for a teacher to be aware of every instance of bullying that happens at their school.


Wednesday, September 9, 2015

Bully S/R (Redo)

Lee Hirsch’s “Bully” Summary Response


Summary:
  • Topic sentence:The documentary “Bully”, directed by Lee Hirsch, confronts the true horror some American students face being mercilessly bullied by their peers at school.
  • Hirsch shows that all over the United States, children are terrified to come to school because they fear for their safety. This documentary brings to light how children are being ruthlessly bullied by their peers as the adults, who are supposed to protect them, just stand by and watch it happen. Bullying causes mental injury, physical injury, and death.
  • Concluding sentence: In conclusion, Hirsch shows how bullying is a nationwide epidemic and children have died due to schools’ ignorance.


Response:
  • Topic sentence: The documentary “Bully”, directed by Lee Hirsch correctly illustrates,the immense problems that arise when schools and officials refuse to admit that their systems are faulty and change their bullying policies. Hirsch shows that these faults are actively costing children their lives because schools let these children
  • Claim 1:
    • Set-up: Many school systems are set up in such a way that bullying is not something that is monitored and instead it is the victim’s responsibility to talk to the officials, who often do nothing anyways. This shames victims in vulnerable states into believing it’s their fault they’re being hurt.
    • Lead in: Alex Libby, a twelve-year-old boy being bullied, feels that it was his fault the bullying continued because he didn’t alert adults. He recalls,
    • Quote:  “I didn’t tell them what was going on, which was my mistake.” (Hirsch)
    • Explanation: Children are very impressionable, and making it their responsibility to set aside their learning to talk to an official who may or may not believe them when they are in their worst states is just setting kids up for failure. Many kids have disabilities that make it near impossible for them to stand up for themselves or talk to faculty.
    • Conclusion: While it’s important that kids learn to be a self-advocate, the stakes should never be set as high as mental/physical injury, or even death.
  • Counterclaim 1: However, ....
    • Set Up: However, while most of the blame for bullying falls on the school system, there is only so much that the teachers can do to protect their students. Students and parents are always very fast to place blame on the school system, when in fact, there is a limit to what the teachers can prevent. Ultimately, kids will be mean, and kids will say and do hurtful things.
    • Lead In: An assistant principal in the Murray County School District discussed the practicality of assigning responsibility for the kids onto the schools. She stated,
    • Quote: “We can’t stop kids from saying bad things and we can’t watch what kids do every minute”.  (Hirsch)
    • Explanation: The school system cannot be blamed for all bullying because, even though parents hope that teachers know what their child is doing while they are at school, there is no possible way for the teachers to monitor every child, every second of the day.
    • Concluding Sentence: In conclusion, there is no logical way for a teacher to be aware of every instance of bullying that happens at their school.

Rebuttal:
  • At first glance, it seems as though the teachers may not be responsible for everything that happens while children are at school, but upon further analysis of of each situation, the ultimate responsibility falls on the teachers.  
  • It cannot be denied that schools can’t keep tabs on everything every student says every second of the day.
  • While this view seems reasonable at first glance, a closer look at the responsibilities of schools must be taken. It is the law to go to school. When a parent sends a child to school, they are entrusting the teachers and officials with the safety and well-being of their child. It is unacceptable for these places that shape the rest of a child’s life to knowingly foster hateful speech and painful actions. When a child is beat up at school or commits suicide because of bullying, the school has broken the trust to the parents and has failed the child.
  • In conclusion, bullying is a serious fault, and cannot be treated with ignorance any longer, as this fault is killing children.


Wednesday, September 2, 2015

Bully Summary Response Outline

Summary Response Outline

Summary:
  • Topic sentence:The documentary “Bully”, directed by Lee Hirsch, confronts the true horror some American students face being mercilessly bullied by their peers at school.
  • Supporting ideas to prove main ideas
  • All over the United States, children are terrified to come to school because they fear for their safety. This documentary brings to light how children are being ruthlessly bullied by their peers as the adults, who are supposed to protect them, just stand by and watch it happen. Bullying causes mental injury, physical injury, and death.
  • Concluding sentence: In conclusion, bullying is a nationwide epidemic and more children will die until the school system changes,

Response:
  • Topic sentence: The documentary “Bully”, directed by Lee Hirsch correctly illustrates,the immense problems that arise when schools and officials refuse to admit that their systems are faulty and change their bullying policies. These faults are actively costing children their lives.
  • Claim 1:
    • Set-up: Many school systems are set up in such a way that bullying is not something that is monitored and instead it is the victim’s responsibility to talk to the officials, who often do nothing anyways. This shames victims in vulnerable states into believing it’s their fault they’re being hurt.
    • Lead in: Alex Libby, a twelve-year-old boy being bullied, recalls,
    • Quote:  “I didn’t tell them what was going on, which was my mistake.”
    • Explanation: Children are very impressionable, and making it their responsibility to set aside their learning to talk to an official who may or may not believe them when they are in their worst states is just setting kids up for failure. Many kids have disabilities that make it near impossible for them to stand up for themselves or talk to faculty.
    • Conclusion: While it’s important that kids learn to be a self-advocate, the stakes should never be set as high as mental/physical injury, or even death.
  • Counterclaim 1: However, ....
    • Set Up: However, while most of the blame for bullying falls on the school system, there is only so much that the teachers can do to protect their students. Students and parents are always very fast to place blame on the school system, when in fact, there is a limit to what the teachers can prevent. Ultimately, kids will be mean, and kids will say and do hurtful things.
    • Lead In: An assistant principal in the Murray County School District very accurately stated,
    • Quote: “We can’t stop kids from saying bad things and we can’t watch what kids do every minute”.
    • Explanation: The school system cannot be blamed for all bullying because, even though parents hope that teachers know what their child is doing every second that they are at school, there is no possible way for the teachers to monitor every child, every second of the day.
    • Concluding Sentence: In conclusion, there is no logical way for a teacher to be aware of every instance of bullying that happens at their school.
    • What are the strengths/ flaws of this argument?


Rebuttal:
  • At first glance, it seems as though the teachers may not be responsible for everything that happens while children are at school, but upon further analysis of of each situation, the ultimate responsibility falls on the teachers.  
  • We cannot deny that schools can’t keep tabs on everything every student says every second of the day.
  • While this view seems reasonable at first glance, we should look closer at the responsibilities of schools. It is the law to go to school. When a parent sends a child to school, they are entrusting the teachers and officials with the safety and well-being of their child. It is unacceptable for these places that shape the rest of a child’s life to knowingly foster hateful speech and painful actions. When a child is beat up at school or commits suicide because of bullying, the school has broken the trust to the parents and has failed the child.
  • In conclusion, bullying is a serious fault, and cannot be treated with ignorance any longer, as this fault is killing children.